Graptopetalum paraguayensis , or the “ghost plant”, is a great, trailing, wandering, ground cover. We love the colors that this plant brings out in a design, complementing the blues, pinks, and purples that so many of the gorgeous succulents have to offer. Each plant has its own unique coloring and shades to offer. It’s extreme hardiness and coloring make it an incredibly versatile plant. We’ve seen it used as a sprawling ground cover, mounding up and filling in entire planters, or for spot color in the smallest of arrangements. Something overlooked, or sometimes unknown about succulents, is that stress brings out their best color. It’s often a combination of factors that causes the stress and each succulents vibrance, but colder temperatures, less water, and more sun, are the big three factors that come into play. Most succulents, in full sun, in the winter, receiving just the right amount of water, will have the best color here in Southern California. With that being said, there is no “one size fits all” answer to bringing out the best color in each plant. Experiment, tweak, and enjoy playing with your succulents.

More Succulent Tips

Irvine Heat Wave – Aeoniums React

All plants have their preferred climates. The majority of succulents are native to South Africa and the Mediterranean,  while they can tolerate droughts, they do not thrive in them. Desert loving cactus will thrive through extreme temperatures, blazing hot sun, and...
Read More

Echeveria Lola

Slow growing, highly collectible, iridescent color, great container accent, easily one of the most sought after echeveria we grow. Not many succulents are white, but a white echeveria like ‘lola’ can work in almost an arrangement. Lola, a hyrbid of Dick Wright,...
Read More

Gold Moss Sedum (De Oro)

Graptopetalum paraguayensis , or the "ghost plant", is a great, trailing, wandering, ground cover. We love the colors that this plant brings out in a design, complementing the blues, pinks, and purples that so many of the gorgeous succulents have to offer. Each plant...
Read More

Aeonium Kiwi

Are we able to refer to an aeonium as a bush? or a shrub? If so, the aeonium kiwi may be the most brilliant shrubbing aeonium available. While the garnet, and suncup, both tend to mound, the tricolor, vibrant hues, of the kiwi are for plant lovers everywhere, not just...
Read More

Jade Succulents

There are many varieties of Jade, all of which are now available at our Irvine location. Some varities like, Hobbit & Gollum, are great for bonsai plants and container gardners because of their overall size(3'), while the tradional Crassula Ovata "Jade" can grow...
Read More

Century Plant Agave Americana

The Century Plant, Blue Agave, or Agave Americana, are some of the largest in the agave family and are recognizable anywhere. Comically named the century plant, it truly only lives 10 - 30 years. The large sword shaped, gray-green leaves spread open in a rosette up to...
Read More

Fan Aloe

The Fan Aloe, or Aloe Plicatilis, is an extremely branching, highly variable, and thus exceedingly unique plant. Growing as a multi branched shrub, or even a small tree, with specimens reaching 10’-15’ tall! Each stem has its own cluster of individual leaves that run...
Read More

Sedum Green Carpet

Sedum ‘Green Carpet’ is a great sun ground cover for any garden. Vigorous & dependable, it can grow over a foot wide in a season. Also great for blending, or transitioning between plants in landscapes or arrangements because of its decorative “mini” leaves....
Read More

Anacampseros Sunrise

The love plant, or Anacampseros Telephiastrum Variegata ‘Sunrise’, is a marvelous plant for containers. Pair easily with the Echeveria ‘Lola’ for similar slow growing, compact, container design, or use it to brighten up a Bromeliad container. These smaller succulents...
Read More

Echeveria (Ech-e-ver-ia)

Echeveria is a rather large genius of succulents, with a wide spectrum of colors and sizes that all have showy rosettes. Because of the rosette forming nature of these plants they were first classified as Sempervivum, but in 1828 the genus was named after Antanasio...
Read More

Visit Us Today

See Locations

Want to Learn more?

Contact Us