Graptopetalum paraguayensis , or the “ghost plant”, is a great, trailing, wandering, ground cover. We love the colors that this plant brings out in a design, complementing the blues, pinks, and purples that so many of the gorgeous succulents have to offer. Each plant has its own unique coloring and shades to offer. It’s extreme hardiness and coloring make it an incredibly versatile plant. We’ve seen it used as a sprawling ground cover, mounding up and filling in entire planters, or for spot color in the smallest of arrangements. Something overlooked, or sometimes unknown about succulents, is that stress brings out their best color. It’s often a combination of factors that causes the stress and each succulents vibrance, but colder temperatures, less water, and more sun, are the big three factors that come into play. Most succulents, in full sun, in the winter, receiving just the right amount of water, will have the best color here in Southern California. With that being said, there is no “one size fits all” answer to bringing out the best color in each plant. Experiment, tweak, and enjoy playing with your succulents.

More Succulent Tips

Agave Attenuata ‘Ray of Light’

Variegation in plants is the appearance of different colors in the leaves. Typically these colors are white, or yellow, where the zones contrast the more common green foliage. The white, or yellow, variegation is from a lack of chlorophyl in the tissue of the plant....
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Blue Elf Aloe

Aloe Blue Elf is one of a few hundred aloes in cultivation today, however, it is one of few that is spineless. The soft tips of this aloe are wispy and gentle to the touch. So often a concern with succulents are their defensive spines. The majority of the succulents...
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Alluadia Procera (Madagascan Ocotillo)

Rarely caring leaves, this intriguing succulent tree is full of character. Long, wandering, round stems are covered in vicious grey spines. When it carries leafs, during the spring, the branches are laced with alternating spines and vibrant green, round, sprouts....
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Echeveria (Ech-e-ver-ia)

Echeveria is a rather large genius of succulents, with a wide spectrum of colors and sizes that all have showy rosettes. Because of the rosette forming nature of these plants they were first classified as Sempervivum, but in 1828 the genus was named after Antanasio...
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Plants that store water

What are succulents? Succulents are plants that store water in their leaves, stems, and even roots. It also gives them a more swollen, or fleshy appearance. In fact, the term succulence is specifically given to these plants for this ability. We can also typically...
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Echeveria Agavoides “Wax Agave”

There are a number of different hybrids of Echeveria Agavoides, Lipstick, Maria, Prolifera, Ebony, Christmas, and Macabea, are all examples of plants that look similar, but aren’t quite the same. While they’re all relatively hardy, some a bit more than others, the...
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Succulent Symmetry & Agave Blue Glow

ucculents in the garden can add contemporary beauty with the use of ancient symmetrical principles. Geometery has been used in gardens, landscapes, and design since the Egyptians and before. Symmetry doesn’t always mean perfectly mirrored, although possible with...
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Succulent Leaves

Have you ever taken a close look at the leaves on your succulents? They can tell you a lot about themselves. While all succulents tend to have a more “plump” appearance, some do more than others. A good, general, guideline with succulents is to water them based on the...
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Kalanchoe Luciae (Thrysiflora)

The Flap Jack Kalanchoe has been misidentified for many years, and still often is, as Thrysiflora, but this vibrant, red edged cultivar is actually Luciae. First described in 1908 and while they both carry the signiture paddle shapped leaves, Luciae stands out from...
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The Spineless Agave (Agave Attenuata)

A mature Agave Attenuata will send up a 5’-10’ curved flower arching upwards and backwards, similar to that of a fox’s tail. It’s no wonder how the attenuata received it’s common name. This was the first truly spineless agave. Many variegated sports and cultivars have...
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