Bromeliads are a type of Succulent.

Graptopetalum paraguayensis , or the “ghost plant”, is a great, trailing, wandering, ground cover. We love the colors that this plant brings out in a design, complementing the blues, pinks, and purples that so many of the gorgeous succulents have to offer. Each plant has its own unique coloring and shades to offer. It’s extreme hardiness and coloring make it an incredibly versatile plant. We’ve seen it used as a sprawling ground cover, mounding up and filling in entire planters, or for spot color in the smallest of arrangements. Something overlooked, or sometimes unknown about succulents, is that stress brings out their best color. It’s often a combination of factors that causes the stress and each succulents vibrance, but colder temperatures, less water, and more sun, are the big three factors that come into play. Most succulents, in full sun, in the winter, receiving just the right amount of water, will have the best color here in Southern California. With that being said, there is no “one size fits all” answer to bringing out the best color in each plant. Experiment, tweak, and enjoy playing with your succulents.

More Succulent Tips

Aeonium Kiwi

Are we able to refer to an aeonium as a bush? or a shrub? If so, the aeonium kiwi may be the most brilliant shrubbing aeonium available. While the garnet, and suncup, both tend to mound, the tricolor, vibrant hues, of the kiwi are for plant lovers everywhere, not just...
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Fire & Ice

Echeveria Subrigida, “Fire and Ice”, isn’t the most common echeveria, but one we love greatly. In optimal conditions the plant will grow up to 18” wide and with its soft, deeply canyoned leafs, it offers the same rosette forming quality of aboutique agave with none of...
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Aloe Plicatilis (Fan Aloe)

Another amazing South African succulent. The Aloe Plicatilis is a remarkable aloe and incredibly unique. The fan aloe is one the five tree-aloes that grow naturally in South Africa. It undoubtedly earns it’s name from the fan-like display of is long, finger like,...
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Echeveria Afterglow

Have you ever taken a close look at the leaves on your succulents? They can tell you a lot about themselves. While all succulents tend to have a more “plump” appearance, some do more than others. A good, general, guideline with succulents is to water them based on the...
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Hybrid Aloes

A little bit about Aloes and their hybrids. The vast majority of aloes, over 125 species, come from South Africa, the remaining from Southwest Asia and Madagascar. Currently, there are almost 500 different species, with many over the last few years being hybrids. Only...
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Echeveria (Ech-e-ver-ia)

Echeveria is a rather large genius of succulents, with a wide spectrum of colors and sizes that all have showy rosettes. Because of the rosette forming nature of these plants they were first classified as Sempervivum, but in 1828 the genus was named after Antanasio...
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Century Plants

A common misconception about agave is that they flower every 100 years. “The Century Plant” is the common name given to Agave Americana, and some of its variegated counter parts, Agave Americana Variegata, and Agave Americana Medio-Picta ‘Alba’ are just a couple. The...
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Kalanchoe Fedtschenkoi “Aurora Borealis”

Kalanchoe Fedtschenkoi Marginata "Aurora Borealis". The name of this plant is a real mouthful. The scalloped purple leaves of the Fedtschenkoi take on bright ivory, cream, colored edges. These cream edges cast a soft pink band when exposed to higher light. Aurora...
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Blue Elf Aloe

Aloe Blue Elf is one of a few hundred aloes in cultivation today, however, it is one of few that is spineless. The soft tips of this aloe are wispy and gentle to the touch. So often a concern with succulents are their defensive spines. The majority of the succulents...
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Desert Rose

Adenium obesum is a succulent member of the Oleander family. It originates in East Africa, from regions where it rains frequently in the summer, but is very dry in winter. It blooms in the early spring, and again in the fall. The Desert Rose needs a nice dry soil mix,...
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