A showy hybrid of Echeveria Gibbiflora done by master Dick Wright, this particularly wavy and bumpy cultivar is named after a still active volcano in Hawaii. Mauna Loa, or “Long Mountain” in Hawaiian, is located on the Big Island of Hawaii and has erupted an average of once every 6 years for the past 300 years. The old leaves on this echeveria take on a deep red color and carry the most pronounced carunculations (bumps, or protrusions). These carunculations are loved by some and hated by others. The uniqueness of each bump on each leaf can draw people in or push them away. Echeveria ‘Mauna Loa’ is one of three echeverias in the ‘volcano series’. Other volcanic echeverias include, ‘Barbillion’, and ‘Etna’, a cross between ‘Mauna Loa’ and ‘Barbillion’. ‘Mauna Loa’ is the largest of the three and with proper beheading can grow in excess of 18” across on a strong thick stem, but all three have their similar, yet unique, carunculations.

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Fire & Ice

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