Graptopetalum paraguayensis , or the “ghost plant”, is a great, trailing, wandering, ground cover. We love the colors that this plant brings out in a design, complementing the blues, pinks, and purples that so many of the gorgeous succulents have to offer. Each plant has its own unique coloring and shades to offer. It’s extreme hardiness and coloring make it an incredibly versatile plant. We’ve seen it used as a sprawling ground cover, mounding up and filling in entire planters, or for spot color in the smallest of arrangements. Something overlooked, or sometimes unknown about succulents, is that stress brings out their best color. It’s often a combination of factors that causes the stress and each succulents vibrance, but colder temperatures, less water, and more sun, are the big three factors that come into play. Most succulents, in full sun, in the winter, receiving just the right amount of water, will have the best color here in Southern California. With that being said, there is no “one size fits all” answer to bringing out the best color in each plant. Experiment, tweak, and enjoy playing with your succulents.

More Succulent Tips

Elephant Bush Flowers

Nearly all plants flower. Trees, shrubs, vines, and even weeds produce flowers. However, in many cases, it takes many years for a plant to reach a flowering maturity and can be an uncommon sight. The flowers on the portulacaria afra, or “Elephants Food” (because in...
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Turquoise Landscape Rock

Adding rocks to a landscape design can be the missing touch in a garden. Landscape rocks add another dimension, allowing our eyes to wander to a new depth in the design. They also add texture and contrast. With the right rocks, the design can highlight colors and...
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Anacampseros Sunrise

The love plant, or Anacampseros Telephiastrum Variegata ‘Sunrise’, is a marvelous plant for containers. Pair easily with the Echeveria ‘Lola’ for similar slow growing, compact, container design, or use it to brighten up a Bromeliad container. These smaller succulents...
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Shrubbing Euphorbias

Euphorbia Ascot Rainbow, Blackbird, Blue Haze, Glacier Blue, Martinni, Ruby Glow, Shorty, and Silver Swan. These Euphorbias are an easy way to bring soft color into any garden, drought tolerant, or not. Many have been selected because of their distinct variegated...
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The Spineless Agave (Agave Attenuata)

A mature Agave Attenuata will send up a 5’-10’ curved flower arching upwards and backwards, similar to that of a fox’s tail. It’s no wonder how the attenuata received it’s common name. This was the first truly spineless agave. Many variegated sports and cultivars have...
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Sempervivum (Houseleeks) (Hens and chicks)

Sempervivum, aka Houseleeks, and Hens and Chicks, have been known and written about for thousands of years. These succulents are native to the mountains of Europe and the Mediterranean. They were once considered sacred in ancient mythology of the Nordics and Romans....
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Yucca Rostrata

Colors are fun to play with in the garden. Use the blue leaves of the Yucca Rostrata to transition to a blue hued garden. Focus on the Rostrata for a focal point, an Agave ‘Blue Glow’ or ‘Celsii Nova’ for medium height, and finish off with Sedum Clavatum and Turquoise...
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Agave Parryi Truncata

A stunning blue grey agave that many people recognize and love. Defined as a medium small agave, but it can form clumps larger that 5’ wide. Individual plants typically only reach 3’ tall by 3’ wide. However, this slower growing agave has been reported to reach up to...
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Aeonium Garnet

A striking, low growing plant, that reaches up to 3’ tall, offsetting heavily with big, round, rosettes, that have a fantastic dark bronze color in full sun. Hybridized by Jack Catlin when he crossed ‘zwartkopf’ and tabuliforme. Three plants emerged, with one not...
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Kalanchoe Luciae (Thrysiflora)

The Flap Jack Kalanchoe has been misidentified for many years, and still often is, as Thrysiflora, but this vibrant, red edged cultivar is actually Luciae. First described in 1908 and while they both carry the signiture paddle shapped leaves, Luciae stands out from...
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