Graptopetalum paraguayensis , or the “ghost plant”, is a great, trailing, wandering, ground cover. We love the colors that this plant brings out in a design, complementing the blues, pinks, and purples that so many of the gorgeous succulents have to offer. Each plant has its own unique coloring and shades to offer. It’s extreme hardiness and coloring make it an incredibly versatile plant. We’ve seen it used as a sprawling ground cover, mounding up and filling in entire planters, or for spot color in the smallest of arrangements. Something overlooked, or sometimes unknown about succulents, is that stress brings out their best color. It’s often a combination of factors that causes the stress and each succulents vibrance, but colder temperatures, less water, and more sun, are the big three factors that come into play. Most succulents, in full sun, in the winter, receiving just the right amount of water, will have the best color here in Southern California. With that being said, there is no “one size fits all” answer to bringing out the best color in each plant. Experiment, tweak, and enjoy playing with your succulents.

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Felt Plant – Kalanchoe Beharensis

The “Felt Plant”, kalanchoe beharensis, is an amazing succulent that becomes more and more unique with age. Even in cultivation, two plants don’t seem to grow the same. Some form tall, unbranching singles, over 6’ tall, others split at an early age and grow in the...
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Contemporary Succulents

Contemporary gardens are becoming more and water wise and are more appealing for their easy-care. The gardens contain lots of stone, wood, and bold containers with architectural plants. The plants, not used as lushly, stand out even more. The clean lines of the...
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Agave Guiengola ‘Creme Brulee’

Agave ‘Creme Brulee’ is the variegated form of an Agave Guiengola, the “Whales Tail” agave. Succulents are able to store water in their leaves, stems, and roots, giving them their fleshy appearance. The massive, fleshy, leaves of the Agave Guiengola and its variegated...
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Hybrid Aloes

A little bit about Aloes and their hybrids. The vast majority of aloes, over 125 species, come from South Africa, the remaining from Southwest Asia and Madagascar. Currently, there are almost 500 different species, with many over the last few years being hybrids. Only...
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Variegated Campfire Crassula

Crassula Capitella ‘Campfire’ is a gorgeous green, red, succulent, becoming more red in full sun in the winter with short cool nights, and bright light. In the spring/summer, with regular irrigation, the plant will turn more green as it grows. Lilian True, a...
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Kalanchoe Fedtschenkoi “Aurora Borealis”

Kalanchoe Fedtschenkoi Marginata "Aurora Borealis". The name of this plant is a real mouthful. The scalloped purple leaves of the Fedtschenkoi take on bright ivory, cream, colored edges. These cream edges cast a soft pink band when exposed to higher light. Aurora...
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Kalanchoe Orgyalis Copper Spoons

The golden bronze leaves on this Kalanchoe give it the same finish as a new copper penny. Branching, succulent shrub that if given the proper conditions can reach up to 6’ tall. They way this plant gets its name is almost as interesting as the plant itself. Kalanchoe...
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Succulent Flowers – Calandrina

Flowers are popping up all over the places in succulent gardens this time of year. Echeverias, with their tiny, tinker-bell shapped flowers, and agaves, shooting giant 30' blooms, but none is more spectacular than the chilean bloomer, Calandrinia Grandiflora. This...
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An Aeoniums Abilities

Aeoniums are some of the most gorgeous plants available, succulent or not. They fit a number of landscape themes and can be used for their vibrant colors, varying shapes, beautiful rosettes, as much as their low water needs. Tall, short, purple, green, we grow only a...
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Kalanchoe Luciae (Thrysiflora)

The Flap Jack Kalanchoe has been misidentified for many years, and still often is, as Thrysiflora, but this vibrant, red edged cultivar is actually Luciae. First described in 1908 and while they both carry the signiture paddle shapped leaves, Luciae stands out from...
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