Graptopetalum paraguayensis , or the “ghost plant”, is a great, trailing, wandering, ground cover. We love the colors that this plant brings out in a design, complementing the blues, pinks, and purples that so many of the gorgeous succulents have to offer. Each plant has its own unique coloring and shades to offer. It’s extreme hardiness and coloring make it an incredibly versatile plant. We’ve seen it used as a sprawling ground cover, mounding up and filling in entire planters, or for spot color in the smallest of arrangements. Something overlooked, or sometimes unknown about succulents, is that stress brings out their best color. It’s often a combination of factors that causes the stress and each succulents vibrance, but colder temperatures, less water, and more sun, are the big three factors that come into play. Most succulents, in full sun, in the winter, receiving just the right amount of water, will have the best color here in Southern California. With that being said, there is no “one size fits all” answer to bringing out the best color in each plant. Experiment, tweak, and enjoy playing with your succulents.

More Succulent Tips

Black Rose Aeonium

A great way to bring some soft height into a design. These plants are truly amazing. The name Aeonium ‘Zwartkop’ comes from the dutch translation of “black head”, but it is also thought to have been of a German hybridization going under the name ‘Schwartzkopf’. Plants...
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Succulent Symmetry & Agave Blue Glow

ucculents in the garden can add contemporary beauty with the use of ancient symmetrical principles. Geometery has been used in gardens, landscapes, and design since the Egyptians and before. Symmetry doesn’t always mean perfectly mirrored, although possible with...
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Aeonium Garnet

A striking, low growing plant, that reaches up to 3’ tall, offsetting heavily with big, round, rosettes, that have a fantastic dark bronze color in full sun. Hybridized by Jack Catlin when he crossed ‘zwartkopf’ and tabuliforme. Three plants emerged, with one not...
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Irvine Heat Wave – Aeoniums React

All plants have their preferred climates. The majority of succulents are native to South Africa and the Mediterranean,  while they can tolerate droughts, they do not thrive in them. Desert loving cactus will thrive through extreme temperatures, blazing hot sun, and...
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An Aeoniums Abilities

Aeoniums are some of the most gorgeous plants available, succulent or not. They fit a number of landscape themes and can be used for their vibrant colors, varying shapes, beautiful rosettes, as much as their low water needs. Tall, short, purple, green, we grow only a...
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Agave Parryi Truncata

A stunning blue grey agave that many people recognize and love. Defined as a medium small agave, but it can form clumps larger that 5’ wide. Individual plants typically only reach 3’ tall by 3’ wide. However, this slower growing agave has been reported to reach up to...
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Echeveria Mauna Loa

A showy hybrid of Echeveria Gibbiflora done by master Dick Wright, this particularly wavy and bumpy cultivar is named after a still active volcano in Hawaii. Mauna Loa, or “Long Mountain” in Hawaiian, is located on the Big Island of Hawaii and has erupted an average...
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The Spineless Agave (Agave Attenuata)

A mature Agave Attenuata will send up a 5’-10’ curved flower arching upwards and backwards, similar to that of a fox’s tail. It’s no wonder how the attenuata received it’s common name. This was the first truly spineless agave. Many variegated sports and cultivars have...
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Yucca Rostrata

Colors are fun to play with in the garden. Use the blue leaves of the Yucca Rostrata to transition to a blue hued garden. Focus on the Rostrata for a focal point, an Agave ‘Blue Glow’ or ‘Celsii Nova’ for medium height, and finish off with Sedum Clavatum and Turquoise...
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Sedum Pachyphllum (Jelly Beans)

A cute and playful sprawling succulent from Mexico. It won’t grow much over a foot tall before crippling over by it’s own weight. Easily roots from fallen leaves, and as it spreads each stem forms roots and becomes it’s own mother plant. The small jelly bean like...
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