Sedum Green Carpet Succulent for Sale. Best Wholesale Prices

Sedum ‘Green Carpet’ is a great sun ground cover for any garden. Vigorous & dependable, it can grow over a foot wide in a season. Also great for blending, or transitioning between plants in landscapes or arrangements because of its decorative “mini” leaves. Vibrant green, carpet like foliage stays attractive and takes on soft reddish tones in the cooler months of fall and winter. Easy to grow in poor soil with excellent drainage. This sedum is a sun loving ground cover and it  truly embraces the heat, & most importantly, thrives on skipped waterings. One of the more vigorous sedum that loves to creep through uncharted areas. ‘Green Carpet’ can be used for edging in the sun garden, or anywhere the hose or sprinklers don’t frequent. Plant in full sun to partial shade, water infrequently, and it wont miss you if you go out of town for the weekend.

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Fire & Ice

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Agave Parryi Truncata

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The Millenium Dragon (Dracaena Draco)

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Succulent Leaves

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Carunculations (Echeveria Etna)

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Alluadia Procera (Madagascan Ocotillo)

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