Water your succulents from drought tolerant plant experts

While cactus thrive on neglect and truly don’t need much water, succulents actually prefer regular water to look their best. While they will still be able to survive periods of drought, keep them irrigated regular for that full, lush, look. The first step to determine how much to water your plants, is to be sure they are first in a nice and light cactus/succulent soil mix and they are getting plenty of good bright light. If this is the case, and the plants are drying correctly, they need to be watered thoroughly when they need it. Thoroughly means completely leaching the soil and having water run through the bottom of the pot. Don’t forget to discard any water sitting in the plants saucer, we don’t want our plants sitting in water for a prolonged period of time. The ability for the plants to dry completely will be affected by a few environmental factors, but as long as you’re following the dry to wet rule you’ll be just fine. For example, in the winter, shorter days, cooler nights, plants will not dry as fast and won’t need to be watered as often. On the contrary, during the summer, the plants will not only be growing, but the days will be drying up the plants quicker and they’ll need more water, more often. Good luck with watering your succulents, and if you ever have more specific questions about plant locations or types of succulents don’t hesitate to ask us on facebook, email, or in person at the store.

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