All plants have their preferred climates. The majority of succulents are native to South Africa and the Mediterranean,  while they can tolerate droughts, they do not thrive in them. Desert loving cactus will thrive through extreme temperatures, blazing hot sun, and long periods of drought, but the softer succulents that we know and love don’t like to be kept in baking hot areas. We often field questions about a plants ability to take “full sun”, or “afternoon sun”, and the answers are always different. There are many more variables than time of day alone. Full sun on the coast is different than full sun in the valley. A good rule of thumb, if it is a new plant, or a new area, is to test it before planting a large group, or ease a plant into a new area. Many plants grow up facing one direction for the duration of their life and the simple task of planting a plant facing the opposite direction can result in a fatal burn. When we move large, specimen, pieces, we cover the plant with shade cloth in an effort to acclimate it to its new location. It may not be the most beautiful site in a backyard, but just a couple of days under some shade could save a one of a kind Aloe Dichotoma from never recovering. Pick up some shade cloth, and be careful adding new plants to new locations. Photo is of Crassula ‘Silver Dollar’, a variety of jade that CAN tolerate more heat than some of its softer counterparts.

More Succulent Tips

Echeveria Afterglow

Have you ever taken a close look at the leaves on your succulents? They can tell you a lot about themselves. While all succulents tend to have a more “plump” appearance, some do more than others. A good, general, guideline with succulents is to water them based on the...

Echeveria (Ech-e-ver-ia)

Echeveria is a rather large genius of succulents, with a wide spectrum of colors and sizes that all have showy rosettes. Because of the rosette forming nature of these plants they were first classified as Sempervivum, but in 1828 the genus was named after Antanasio...

Fire & Ice

Echeveria Subrigida, “Fire and Ice”, isn’t the most common echeveria, but one we love greatly. In optimal conditions the plant will grow up to 18” wide and with its soft, deeply canyoned leafs, it offers the same rosette forming quality of aboutique agave with none of...

Euphorbia Tirucalli ‘Pencil Cactus’

While the Euphorbia Tirucalli can be a very rewarding plant, we must be very careful in where we plant them and in propagation. The milky white latex found in the plant can be dangerous to the skin and most definitely will cause serious damage if swallowed, or if any...

Sedum Nussbaumerianum – Coppertone Stonecrop

Graptopetalum paraguayensis , or the "ghost plant", is a great, trailing, wandering, ground cover. We love the colors that this plant brings out in a design, complementing the blues, pinks, and purples that so many of the gorgeous succulents have to offer. Each plant...

Agave Parryi Truncata

A stunning blue grey agave that many people recognize and love. Defined as a medium small agave, but it can form clumps larger that 5’ wide. Individual plants typically only reach 3’ tall by 3’ wide. However, this slower growing agave has been reported to reach up to...

Shrubbing Euphorbias

Euphorbia Ascot Rainbow, Blackbird, Blue Haze, Glacier Blue, Martinni, Ruby Glow, Shorty, and Silver Swan. These Euphorbias are an easy way to bring soft color into any garden, drought tolerant, or not. Many have been selected because of their distinct variegated...

The Spineless Agave (Agave Attenuata)

A mature Agave Attenuata will send up a 5’-10’ curved flower arching upwards and backwards, similar to that of a fox’s tail. It’s no wonder how the attenuata received it’s common name. This was the first truly spineless agave. Many variegated sports and cultivars have...

Tree Aloes – Aloe Thraskii

Aloe is an enormous genus containing well over 500 different species and it can be quiet overwhelming, but the beauty of this large genus, native to Africa, is that it is so vast. There are endless applications for aloes and one of the toughest things to do in a...

Desert Rose

Adenium obesum is a succulent member of the Oleander family. It originates in East Africa, from regions where it rains frequently in the summer, but is very dry in winter. It blooms in the early spring, and again in the fall. The Desert Rose needs a nice dry soil mix,...

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