Aeonium Sunburst varies a great deal from plant to plant. Some will grow on strong sturdy stems as singular plants, while others will produce many offsets and grow into unique character pieces. Even the variegation of each sunburst is different from plant to plant. The green band running down the center of each leaf will occasionally take over the entire leaf leaving the yellow margins non existent. However, the leaves can also completely revert in the opposite direction and take on all yellow, almost white, appearance. The leaf variegation is also different, not only from plant to plant, but from offset to offset, or leaf to leaf. A typically variegated sunburst may have additional offsets that grow all yellow, all green, or sometimes the head of the plant will take on a 50/50 appearance, with half being of a more traditional variegation, and the other half showing one of the two variations referred to above. Look closely at the photo and your own sunburst. Does it have any unique variegation?

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