Aeonium Sunburst varies a great deal from plant to plant. Some will grow on strong sturdy stems as singular plants, while others will produce many offsets and grow into unique character pieces. Even the variegation of each sunburst is different from plant to plant. The green band running down the center of each leaf will occasionally take over the entire leaf leaving the yellow margins non existent. However, the leaves can also completely revert in the opposite direction and take on all yellow, almost white, appearance. The leaf variegation is also different, not only from plant to plant, but from offset to offset, or leaf to leaf. A typically variegated sunburst may have additional offsets that grow all yellow, all green, or sometimes the head of the plant will take on a 50/50 appearance, with half being of a more traditional variegation, and the other half showing one of the two variations referred to above. Look closely at the photo and your own sunburst. Does it have any unique variegation?

More Succulent Tips

Succulent Leaves

Have you ever taken a close look at the leaves on your succulents? They can tell you a lot about themselves. While all succulents tend to have a more “plump” appearance, some do more than others. A good, general, guideline with succulents is to water them based on the...
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Aloe Hybrid Sunset at sunset

As promised, a photo of the Aloe Hybrid Sunset at Sunset. There are well over 500 cultivars of aloe, many of which are recent hybrids, and more often than not, we the growers, can’t tell them apart. But this aloe, Hybrid Sunset, is a remarkable hybrid. Kelly Griffin,...
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Echeveria Lola

Slow growing, highly collectible, iridescent color, great container accent, easily one of the most sought after echeveria we grow. Not many succulents are white, but a white echeveria like ‘lola’ can work in almost an arrangement. Lola, a hyrbid of Dick Wright,...
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Kalanchoe Luciae (Thrysiflora)

The Flap Jack Kalanchoe has been misidentified for many years, and still often is, as Thrysiflora, but this vibrant, red edged cultivar is actually Luciae. First described in 1908 and while they both carry the signiture paddle shapped leaves, Luciae stands out from...
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Turquoise Landscape Rock

Adding rocks to a landscape design can be the missing touch in a garden. Landscape rocks add another dimension, allowing our eyes to wander to a new depth in the design. They also add texture and contrast. With the right rocks, the design can highlight colors and...
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Aptenia Cordifolia Variegata

While many succulents grow into large tree like specimens, or never get much bigger than their original size, some grow on and on and are ideal ground covers for both drought tolerant and tropical gardens. Their are many families of succulents, but the crassula,...
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Saguaro and Cardon

The Carnegiea Gigantea, “Saguaro”, and Pachycereus Pringlei, “Cardon”, are very similar cactus with extremely dissimilar growth rates. The Saguaro can grow over 50’ tall with many branching arms, but it may take up to 75 years for it to develop it’s arms, and some...
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Desert Rose

Adenium obesum is a succulent member of the Oleander family. It originates in East Africa, from regions where it rains frequently in the summer, but is very dry in winter. It blooms in the early spring, and again in the fall. The Desert Rose needs a nice dry soil mix,...
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Sedum Spectabile

There are well over 500 varieties of sedum. Everything from large, blooming, showy sedum, to houseplants, and smaller trailing ground covers. Many of the common drought tolerant sedum are the smaller, more boutique variety, but this showy sedum can grow quite tall....
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Anacampseros Sunrise

The love plant, or Anacampseros Telephiastrum Variegata ‘Sunrise’, is a marvelous plant for containers. Pair easily with the Echeveria ‘Lola’ for similar slow growing, compact, container design, or use it to brighten up a Bromeliad container. These smaller succulents...
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