Variegated Campfire Crassula

Crassula Capitella ‘Campfire’ is a gorgeous green, red, succulent, becoming more red in full sun in the winter with short cool nights, and bright light. In the spring/summer, with regular irrigation, the plant will turn more green as it grows. Lilian True, a sanseveria hybridizer, and plant enthusiast, is rumored to be the original American source for this South African plant. While we love growing and using the original variety of campfire as a light groundcover, and cascading container plant, we have also fallen in love with its variegated counterpart. This variegated variety fairs better with a little less sunlight which amplifies its white, pink, apple green leaves. Too much sunlight will force this variegated plant into an almost all red state not really leaving it noticeably different enough from the original cultivar. Cover slightly, use in arrangements or as a light ground cover.

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