Aloe is an enormous genus containing well over 500 different species and it can be quiet overwhelming, but the beauty of this large genus, native to Africa, is that it is so vast. There are endless applications for aloes and one of the toughest things to do in a succulent garden is add height. That is where the different tree aloes can really make a difference. They add another level to a design, turning a two dimensional landscape into 3D. The Aloe Thraskii, or “Coast Aloe”,  is an un-branching tree aloe that can grow up to 10’ tall. The Coast Aloe has beautiful winter flowers of orange and yellow with up to 20 individual stems. We also offer a number of different tree aloes, Vaombe, Bainseii, Dichotoma, Hercules, and Marlothii are just a few. Keep in mind how you’ll be adding height to your next succulent garden.

More Succulent Tips

Cordyline Australis ‘Sunrise’

Cordyline Australis, or the new zealand cabbage tree, is a plant that can grow upwards of 20’ with many branching arms. While ‘sunrise’ will most likely grow slower it still may achieve that 10’+ height with branches. The linear burgundy red leaves have a pink margin...

Bromeliads

Graptopetalum paraguayensis , or the "ghost plant", is a great, trailing, wandering, ground cover. We love the colors that this plant brings out in a design, complementing the blues, pinks, and purples that so many of the gorgeous succulents have to offer. Each plant...

Felt Plant – Kalanchoe Beharensis

The “Felt Plant”, kalanchoe beharensis, is an amazing succulent that becomes more and more unique with age. Even in cultivation, two plants don’t seem to grow the same. Some form tall, unbranching singles, over 6’ tall, others split at an early age and grow in the...

Jade Succulents

There are many varieties of Jade, all of which are now available at our Irvine location. Some varities like, Hobbit & Gollum, are great for bonsai plants and container gardners because of their overall size(3'), while the tradional Crassula Ovata "Jade" can grow...

Succulent Flowers – Calandrina

Flowers are popping up all over the places in succulent gardens this time of year. Echeverias, with their tiny, tinker-bell shapped flowers, and agaves, shooting giant 30' blooms, but none is more spectacular than the chilean bloomer, Calandrinia Grandiflora. This...

Carunculations (Echeveria Etna)

Named after the most active and violent volcano in all of  europe. Sicily’s Mt. Etna has been active for over a million years and is still erupting today. The word ‘etna’ is derived from the phoenician word meaning “furnace”. This particular echeveria is not the first...

Saguaro and Cardon

The Carnegiea Gigantea, “Saguaro”, and Pachycereus Pringlei, “Cardon”, are very similar cactus with extremely dissimilar growth rates. The Saguaro can grow over 50’ tall with many branching arms, but it may take up to 75 years for it to develop it’s arms, and some...

Blue Sky Echeveria

We would classify this friendly and vigorous succulent as one of the quicker and larger echeveria. While individual rosettes can grow up to 8” inches wide, it will also offset freely to form large solid clumps over a foot wide. With more sun and colder nights,...

Succulent Leaves

Have you ever taken a close look at the leaves on your succulents? They can tell you a lot about themselves. While all succulents tend to have a more “plump” appearance, some do more than others. A good, general, guideline with succulents is to water them based on the...

Aeonium Cyclops

Why do you think they call it this Aeonium Cyclops? We think it’s because this hybrid cross of Aeonium Zwartkop and Undulatum grows solitary and uniquely purple with a soft green center. During the winter growing months the leafs will open up and become more green,...

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