Echeveria is a rather large genius of succulents, with a wide spectrum of colors and sizes that all have showy rosettes. Because of the rosette forming nature of these plants they were first classified as Sempervivum, but in 1828 the genus was named after Antanasio Echeverria, a Mexican botanical artist who had produced thousands of illustrations of the genus. With well over 100 varieties of echeveria they thrive and prosper in many different settings. Many in the americas grow in higher elevations making them more cold hardy and more drought tolerant. These high elevation echeverias grow on cliff sides, thriving in areas that seem uninhabitable. The porous cliffside rocks and inability to saturate their native soil should be a clue for watering echeverias, they will not require much water to thoroughly enjoy a sunny garden location. The Echeveria Imbricata, “Hens and Chicks”, is one of the more hardy echeveria and is able to tolerate lots of sun and heat as well as temperatures down to 20 degrees, making it a highly versatile, extremely hardy, and easy beginner echeveria for a started collection.

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Aeonium Kiwi

Are we able to refer to an aeonium as a bush? or a shrub? If so, the aeonium kiwi may be the most brilliant shrubbing aeonium available. While the garnet, and suncup, both tend to mound, the tricolor, vibrant hues, of the kiwi are for plant lovers everywhere, not just...

Sempervivum Arachnoideum “Cobweb Buttons”

A unique, densely carpeting groundcover with fine white cotton like threads between the leaves tips that form a cobweb appearance. Aptly called “Cobweb Buttons” this plant is one of the many sempervivums in cultivar today. The green leaves can change colors with the...

Water your succulents

While cactus thrive on neglect and truly don’t need much water, succulents actually prefer regular water to look their best. While they will still be able to survive periods of drought, keep them irrigated regular for that full, lush, look. The first step to determine...

Echeveria Mauna Loa

A showy hybrid of Echeveria Gibbiflora done by master Dick Wright, this particularly wavy and bumpy cultivar is named after a still active volcano in Hawaii. Mauna Loa, or “Long Mountain” in Hawaiian, is located on the Big Island of Hawaii and has erupted an average...

Agave Gypsophila

The Fan Aloe, or Aloe Plicatilis, is an extremely branching, highly variable, and thus exceedingly unique plant. Growing as a multi branched shrub, or even a small tree, with specimens reaching 10’-15’ tall! Each stem has its own cluster of individual leaves that run...

Graptopetalum Paraguayense (Ghost Plant)

Graptopetalum paraguayensis , or the "ghost plant", is a great, trailing, wandering, ground cover. We love the colors that this plant brings out in a design, complementing the blues, pinks, and purples that so many of the gorgeous succulents have to offer. Each plant...

Blue Elf Aloe

Aloe Blue Elf is one of a few hundred aloes in cultivation today, however, it is one of few that is spineless. The soft tips of this aloe are wispy and gentle to the touch. So often a concern with succulents are their defensive spines. The majority of the succulents...

Aeonium Cyclops

Why do you think they call it this Aeonium Cyclops? We think it’s because this hybrid cross of Aeonium Zwartkop and Undulatum grows solitary and uniquely purple with a soft green center. During the winter growing months the leafs will open up and become more green,...

This gorgeous, stunning, thick leaf aloe is another Kelly Griffin hybrid that can grow 18” tall and 2’ wide. The leaves of aloe ‘delta lights’ are of a dark evergreen, but are heavily spotted. Some plants may take on even more of the color of the white specs, giving...

Saguaro and Cardon

The Carnegiea Gigantea, “Saguaro”, and Pachycereus Pringlei, “Cardon”, are very similar cactus with extremely dissimilar growth rates. The Saguaro can grow over 50’ tall with many branching arms, but it may take up to 75 years for it to develop it’s arms, and some...

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