Echeveria is a rather large genius of succulents, with a wide spectrum of colors and sizes that all have showy rosettes. Because of the rosette forming nature of these plants they were first classified as Sempervivum, but in 1828 the genus was named after Antanasio Echeverria, a Mexican botanical artist who had produced thousands of illustrations of the genus. With well over 100 varieties of echeveria they thrive and prosper in many different settings. Many in the americas grow in higher elevations making them more cold hardy and more drought tolerant. These high elevation echeverias grow on cliff sides, thriving in areas that seem uninhabitable. The porous cliffside rocks and inability to saturate their native soil should be a clue for watering echeverias, they will not require much water to thoroughly enjoy a sunny garden location. The Echeveria Imbricata, “Hens and Chicks”, is one of the more hardy echeveria and is able to tolerate lots of sun and heat as well as temperatures down to 20 degrees, making it a highly versatile, extremely hardy, and easy beginner echeveria for a started collection.

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The Carnegiea Gigantea, “Saguaro”, and Pachycereus Pringlei, “Cardon”, are very similar cactus with extremely dissimilar growth rates. The Saguaro can grow over 50’ tall with many branching arms, but it may take up to 75 years for it to develop it’s arms, and some...

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We would classify this friendly and vigorous succulent as one of the quicker and larger echeveria. While individual rosettes can grow up to 8” inches wide, it will also offset freely to form large solid clumps over a foot wide. With more sun and colder nights,...

Aeonium Urbicum

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Larger Echeveria (Echeveria Blue Curls)

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Echeveria Afterglow

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Sempervivum Arachnoideum “Cobweb Buttons”

A unique, densely carpeting groundcover with fine white cotton like threads between the leaves tips that form a cobweb appearance. Aptly called “Cobweb Buttons” this plant is one of the many sempervivums in cultivar today. The green leaves can change colors with the...

Kalanchoe Luciae (Thrysiflora)

The Flap Jack Kalanchoe has been misidentified for many years, and still often is, as Thrysiflora, but this vibrant, red edged cultivar is actually Luciae. First described in 1908 and while they both carry the signiture paddle shapped leaves, Luciae stands out from...

Aloe Plicatilis (Fan Aloe)

Another amazing South African succulent. The Aloe Plicatilis is a remarkable aloe and incredibly unique. The fan aloe is one the five tree-aloes that grow naturally in South Africa. It undoubtedly earns it’s name from the fan-like display of is long, finger like,...

Desert Rose

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