Graptopetalum paraguayensis , or the “ghost plant”, is a great, trailing, wandering, ground cover. We love the colors that this plant brings out in a design, complementing the blues, pinks, and purples that so many of the gorgeous succulents have to offer. Each plant has its own unique coloring and shades to offer. It’s extreme hardiness and coloring make it an incredibly versatile plant. We’ve seen it used as a sprawling ground cover, mounding up and filling in entire planters, or for spot color in the smallest of arrangements. Something overlooked, or sometimes unknown about succulents, is that stress brings out their best color. It’s often a combination of factors that causes the stress and each succulents vibrance, but colder temperatures, less water, and more sun, are the big three factors that come into play. Most succulents, in full sun, in the winter, receiving just the right amount of water, will have the best color here in Southern California. With that being said, there is no “one size fits all” answer to bringing out the best color in each plant. Experiment, tweak, and enjoy playing with your succulents.

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Graptopetalum Paraguayense (Ghost Plant)

Graptopetalum paraguayensis , or the "ghost plant", is a great, trailing, wandering, ground cover. We love the colors that this plant brings out in a design, complementing the blues, pinks, and purples that so many of the gorgeous succulents have to offer. Each plant...

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