The Spineless Agave (Agave Attenuata)

A mature Agave Attenuata will send up a 5’-10’ curved flower arching upwards and backwards, similar to that of a fox’s tail. It’s no wonder how the attenuata received it’s common name. This was the first truly spineless agave. Many variegated sports and cultivars have emerged from this plant, but this was the original. Native to Central Mexico, first put into cultivation in the early 1800’s, but there are very few sightings of this plant in nature today. Very popular ornamental plant in cultivation, but very rare in the wild. The soft green color of the attenuata allows it to be used in a number of applications. Green will never go out of style in a garden.

More Succulent Tips

Euphorbia Tirucalli ‘Pencil Cactus’

While the Euphorbia Tirucalli can be a very rewarding plant, we must be very careful in where we plant them and in propagation. The milky white latex found in the plant can be dangerous to the skin and most definitely will cause serious damage if swallowed, or if any...

Sencio Barbertonicus & Vitalis

Senecio Barbertonicus, the more green of the two, is native to Southern Africa and found in a number of states. All of which have similar climates of being hot and dry, having occasional summer rain, long periods of drought, and temperatures near freezing through the...

Succulent Flowers – Calandrina

Flowers are popping up all over the places in succulent gardens this time of year. Echeverias, with their tiny, tinker-bell shapped flowers, and agaves, shooting giant 30' blooms, but none is more spectacular than the chilean bloomer, Calandrinia Grandiflora. This...

Sedum Nussbaumerianum – Coppertone Stonecrop

Graptopetalum paraguayensis , or the "ghost plant", is a great, trailing, wandering, ground cover. We love the colors that this plant brings out in a design, complementing the blues, pinks, and purples that so many of the gorgeous succulents have to offer. Each plant...

Cordyline Australis ‘Sunrise’

Cordyline Australis, or the new zealand cabbage tree, is a plant that can grow upwards of 20’ with many branching arms. While ‘sunrise’ will most likely grow slower it still may achieve that 10’+ height with branches. The linear burgundy red leaves have a pink margin...

Medicinal Aloe

Graptopetalum paraguayensis , or the "ghost plant", is a great, trailing, wandering, ground cover. We love the colors that this plant brings out in a design, complementing the blues, pinks, and purples that so many of the gorgeous succulents have to offer. Each plant...

Agave Lophantha – Quadricolor

We love the versatility of this agave. Quadricolor has the ability to be paired and contrasted with so many different colors. Each green leaf has an exterior yellow variegation and a lime green center, giving the leaf itself three distinct colors. The green allows it...

An Aeoniums Abilities

Aeoniums are some of the most gorgeous plants available, succulent or not. They fit a number of landscape themes and can be used for their vibrant colors, varying shapes, beautiful rosettes, as much as their low water needs. Tall, short, purple, green, we grow only a...

Pet Friendly Houseplants

Plants are so pretty and seem so harmless, we often forget some species aren’t pet friendly and contain poisonous compounds. So, before you impulse-buy that fiddle leaf fig, you’ll want to check if it’s safe for your pets (it’s not!), or else your furbaby could end up...

This gorgeous, stunning, thick leaf aloe is another Kelly Griffin hybrid that can grow 18” tall and 2’ wide. The leaves of aloe ‘delta lights’ are of a dark evergreen, but are heavily spotted. Some plants may take on even more of the color of the white specs, giving...

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Holiday Decorating with Houseplants

Holiday Decorating with Houseplants

The great thing about holiday decorating with houseplants is that they still look stylish once February rolls in! Guests won’t be giving you the side-eye if you leave these decorations out well into spring.

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